What shall we do with a drunken sailor

Early in the Morning

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What shall we do with a drunken sailor

What shall we do with a drunken sailor
What shall we do with a drunken sailor
What shall we do with a drunken sailor
Early in the morning

Hoo ray and up she rises
Hoo ray and up she rises
Hoo ray and up she rises
Early in the morning

Put him in the long boat till he’s sober …

Pull out the plug and wet him all over …

Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him …

Text und Musik: Verfasser unbekannt
Erstmals 1856 (Charles Dickens: Two Dinner Failures, 1856)
Liederbuch der Bundeswehr (1962)

Liederthema:
Liederzeit: vor 1856 : Zeitraum:
Orte:
Geschichte dieses Liedes:

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Abweichungen im Text

Weitere Strophen:

  • Shave his belly with a rusty razor
  • Put him in bed with the captain’s daughter
  • Take him and shake him and try to awake him
  • Have you seen the captain’s daughter?
  • Put him in the bilge and make him drink it
  • Truss him up with a runnin’ bowline
  • Give ’im a dose of salty water
  • Stick on ’is back a mustard plaster
  • Send him up the crow’s nest till he falls down
  • Tie him to the taffrail when she’s yardarm under
  • Soak ’im in oil ’til he sprouts a flipper
  • Put him in the guard room ’til he’s sober
  • Keel haul ’im ’til he’s sober
  • Put him in a hole with an angry weasel
  • Scratch his back with a cat o’ nine tails
  • Put him in the brig on bred and water
  • That’s what we’ll do with the drunken sailor

Anmerkungen zu "What shall we do with a drunken sailor"

Charles Dickens erwähnt das Lied in „Two Dinner Failures, 1856, S. 121/122:

She was tipsy. Her hair was dishevelled her face was red. Empty bottles of every description, she was not particular in her drink, though she preferred rum, betokened the way she had been going. But she heeded not our presence and in the very face of Nemesis of us de frauded innocents of her wronged master and mistress  thus she sang in a loud long sustained howl:

Flare up Mary Flare up
Mary Fiddle iddle um tum
Tow row row

Slowly and sadly we descended the stairs to make out the rest of our dinner with cake and wine. As we regained the salon, the air and the words that the wretched woman was singing, changed. She sang:

Hee roar up she rouses
What shall we do with the drunken sailor

What was to be done with the drunken sailor, was a secondary consideration to what was to be done with the drunken cook…

In dem Liederbuch: „Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties“ (1913, erste Auflage 1910, Collected by W. H. WHALL, Master Mariner, S. 107) wird das Lied so kommentiert:

 It is generally supposed that shantying was never allowed in the Royal Service; this is not quite correct as this song and „Cheerly Man“ were sometimes allowed, particularly in revenue cutters and similar craft, and sotto voce in larger vessels. Both songs were used in the old Indiamen of „John Company“.

What shall we do with a drunken soldier
Put him in the guardroom till he gets sober

These were the only two verses. Each verse began with „Hoo rah and up she rises“. The whole was sung in chorus, in quick march time, with no pause between the verses. It was the only song used for a „stamp and go“ and when crews were reduced and it was no longer possible to „walk away“ with anything the song at once dropped out of use

und in The Independent (Band 67, 1909. S.80f)

wird das Lied in einer Sammlung mit Shantys als „A Main Brace Walk Away Chanty“ nur mit Refrain und einer Strophe zitiert:

What shall we do with a drunken sailor
What shall we do with a drunken sailor
What shall we do with a drunken sailor
Early in the morning ?

Put him in the long boat till he is sober
Put him in the long boat till he is sober
Put him in the long boat till he is sober
Early in the morning
(Stopper and Belay)